Poetry Challenge #11

Thanksgiving has happened…Gobble Gobble! And this post is courtesy of Kelly’s blog. Click over for the original!

The way I learned it, this “Harvest Festival” has been celebrated in the U.S. since the Pilgrims survived that harsh winter of 1621 (with the help of friendly Wampanoag folk), and nationally on and off since 1789 when our 1st Pres, George requested a Congressional Proclamation. And, beginning in 1863 when our 16th Pres. Abe declared the last Thursday in November a national day of “Thanksgiving and Praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth in the Heavens”, every year thereafter.

Sometime along the line–you’ll have to do your own search to find out when exactly–the name was shortened and the date was changed to the 4th Thursday of November (Hence my earlier confusion.)

As the date became fixed, so have Thanksgiving Fixin’s, which now “traditionally” include pie, stuffing, potatoes, corn, cranberry, gravy, and TURKEY! According to the official White House History website, dear Ole’ Abe pardoned the first Thanksgiving Turkey in 1863. Ever since then presidents have been pardoning turkeys, thus leading to this week’s 7-Minute Poetry Challenge Prompt:

Poetry Challenge #11
Pardon Me, Pleeease!
Pretend you are the Turkey. . . or the pumpkin, apple pie, potatoes, cranberries and any other food served on Thanksgiving. Write a poem about why you deserve to not be part of this year’s feast. Begin with this first line: “Oh, please pardon me…” For extra credit make it rhyme.

For inspiration, read Kelly’s poem on her blog!

*Kelly and I began this 7-Minute Poetry Challenge more than 610 days ago. We now take turns creating our own prompts to share with you. If you join us in the 7-Minute Poetry Challenge be sure to let us know by posting the title, a note, or if you want, the whole dang poem, in the comments!

Poetry Challenge #10

And to Think that I Saw It…

List 10 or more things you saw on the bus or in the car this morning on your way to work or school. Or take a walk and list things you see. Pick 5 of the things and put one on each line. Add detail or metaphor (it looks like a…it is as ___ as a ___).

If you can get a friend to do this with you, put your two poems together when you’re both done. Switch every other line. Then read the poem and see if you want to move some lines around to get it in a better order or change some words to make it rhyme (or not rhyme) or sound better.

And if you have more than one friend do this, even better!

Set the timer for 7 minutes.

Start writing!

Don’t think about it too much; just do it.

And, if you do join us in the 7-Minute Poetry Challenge be sure to let us know by posting the title, a note, or if you want, the whole dang poem, in the comments!

Poetry Challenge #9

Dear Santa Baby . . .
Write a letter to Santa. If you’ve been “nice” tell Santa why you deserve to be treated especially nice this holiday season. If you’ve been “naughty”… well, you’ve got some explaining to do.
For extra credit, try writing your letter to Santa in rhyme or song lyrics.
For inspiration, listen to the 1953 recording of Eartha Kit singing “Santa Baby,” written by Joan Javits & Philip Springer:

Set the timer for 7 minutes.

Start writing!

Don’t think about it too much; just do it.

And, if you do join us in the 7-Minute Poetry Challenge be sure to let us know by posting the title, a note, or if you want, the whole dang poem, in the comments!

Poetry Challenge #8

                                                            How Many Haiku?

Haiku is a traditional form of Japanese poetry made up of 3 lines with 5/7/5 syllables on each line. Traditional haiku has something to do with nature, but you can write them about anything.

A poet friend of mine mentioned the fact that the first three lines of the song “Moonlight in Vermont” make a perfect haiku. If you know the song (or at least the tune), you can write haiku very quickly by putting your own words to the tune.

Here’s a link to Willie Nelson singing “Moonlight in Vermont”

How many haiku can you write in 7 minutes? Are you ready?

Set the timer for 7 minutes.

Start writing!

Don’t think about it too much; just do it.

And, if you do join us in the 7-Minute Poetry Challenge be sure to let us know by posting the title, a note, or if you want, the whole dang poem, in the comments!

Poetry Challenge #7

Mixing it UP

For today’s challenge, look around your space and pick out two completely different objects (or people). Write a poem that begins with the differences between the two, and end by exploring how they are the same.

Set the timer for 7 minutes
Start writing!
Don’t think about it too much; just do it.

Write a poem, paragraph, or story. If the prompt moves you, follow it. If it sparks something else, go with it! Our 7-Minute Poetry Challenge is not about writing great poetry; or writing what is expected; it’s not even about writing anything good. It’s about one thing, writing IT!

And, if you do join us in the 7-Minute Poetry Challenge be sure to let us know by posting the title, a note, or if you want, the whole dang poem, in the comments!

This prompt comes from my friend Kelly’s blog with permission. Be sure to check over there for more about why she chose this.

Poetry Challenge #6

This one is easy! It’s all about YOU!!

I am the one who…
Write a list poem. What is it you do? What makes you you?
Think about the things you do in your spare time. Think about the things you have to do. Think about what you wear, or eat, or read, or sing, or…anything.
You can start each line with “I am the one who…” or “I am…” or when you really get going you can connect the lines with “and”. Whatever you do, have fun!

Remember the rules:
Set the timer for 7 minutes
Start writing!
Don’t think about it too much; just do it.
If the prompt moves you, follow it. If it sparks something else, go with it! Our 7-Minute Poetry Challenge is not about writing great poetry; or writing what is expected; it’s not even about writing anything good. It’s about one thing, writing IT!

And if you try this, be sure to let me know in the comments! Or, if you’re really daring, put your poem in the comments!

Poetry Challenge #5

What’s That Noise?
Take a walk—around your house, a store, the school, or your neighborhood.
Write a poem about it. But, rather than focusing on what you see, focus on what you hear.
Extra points for using an onomatopoeia—or a few. In case you forgot: that’s a words that sound like the sound of the object it’s describing.

You know the drill:
Set the timer for 7 minutes
Start writing!
Don’t think about it too much; just do it.
Write a poem, paragraph, or story. If the prompt moves you, follow it. If it sparks something else, go with it! Our 7-Minute Poetry Challenge is not about writing great poetry; or writing what is expected; it’s not even about writing anything good. It’s about one thing, writing IT!

Visit Kelly’s blog to see a sample poem that uses sound and to find out what part of her book NOT NORMAN is the favorite of 2-3 year olds.

Poetry Challenge #4

Counting by Words

Line 1 can have only 1 word today. Line 2 can have 2 words. Keep going in that pattern up to line 10. Extra credit if you can work back down from 10.

If you’re stuck for a topic, write about something you can see right now or your favorite color.

Remember: This doesn’t have to take long. Set your timer for 7 minutes. See what you come up with. Surprise yourself!

Poetry Challenge #3

Grab your pen or pencil and your notebook. Set the timer for 7 minutes and WRITE!!!

In honor of poet, singer-songwriter, cartoonist, screenwriter, and children’s author Shel Silverstein’s birthday (Sept 25, 1930) write a silly-funny poem about a made-up animal–or the perfect birthday party. For inspiration, read one of Shel Silverstein’s Birthday poems:

Happy Birthday Shel Silverstein.jpg

Birthday Snake Shel Silverstein.jpg

Poetry Challenge #2

Back to School—ABC’s

I remember the excitement of going back to school every year, both as a student and a teacher. Friends to see, things to learn, books to read! I barely slept the night before. Always, I loved getting back to the schedule of fall.

Write one line—five words—that begin in order with the letters A, B, C, D, E.

This line will be the first line of your poem.

Add four more lines. Try to begin line 2 with B, line 3 with C, line 4 with D, and line 5 with E.

That’s it! If you try this, let me know in the comments! I’d love to see what you come up with.

Remember the rules:

                                         Read the prompt

                                   Set the timer for 7 minutes

                                         Start writing!

Don’t think about it too much; just do it. Write a poem, paragraph, or story. If the prompt moves you, follow it. If it sparks something else, go with it! Our 7-Minute Poetry Challenge is not about writing great poetry; or writing what is expected; it’s not even about writing anything good. It’s about one thing, writing IT!