Poetry Challenge #20

Memorize a Poem Day!

Did you ever have to memorize a poem for school? Have you memorized a poem just for the fun of it?

Memorizing poems helps you feel the rhythm and rhyme (if there is one) and forces you to look at each word more closely. Plus, you can recite a poem to get through a tough time or to put yourself to sleep. Amazing the uses!

Today, instead of writing a new poem, read some favorites and pick a verse or two or the whole thing to memorize. Say it aloud! Say it in your head! Say it while walking or doing chores or waiting in line.

Some of my favorite poems—and ones that I know some or all of—include C.S. Lewis’s “The Walrus and the Carpenter”, lots of Robert Frost (“Fire and Ice”, “The Road Not Taken”, “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening”), Tennyson’s “The Lady of Shallot”, Eliot’s “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” and many others. What are your favorite poems?

Poetry Challenge #19

It’s a Zippity-Doodle Kind of Day!

Play Time! Before words came letters, before letters came doodles. According to those in the know, doodling, scribbling, and drawing taps into your creative brain–the play filled side. So what happens if we get into a playful mood first, then begin writing?
Give yourself “Permission to Play,” to find your playground voices says Carin Channing, creator of 365 DAYS OF DOODLING, a book Cindy and I are currently using. Time to “Climb Back into the Sandbox, People!”

Start with a blank sheet of paper and pencil (or pen). Doodle your idea of zippity. Zippity might be a thing, a place, or a feeling. Now write a short poem, no more than 10 words, about your Zippity Doodle!

Set the timer for 7 minutes.

Start writing!

Don’t think about it too much; just do it.

*Kelly Bennett and I began this 7-Minute Poetry Challenge at least 680 days ago. We now take turns creating our own prompts to share with you. If you join us in the 7-Minute Poetry Challenge let us know by posting the title, a note, or if you want, the whole dang poem. Scroll down and click on the comments!

Poetry Challenge #18

Moody Blues

Pick two vowel sounds. Make a list of words that use each sound. Write two verses of a poem—use one vowel sound in one verse and the other in the second. Try to use it in as many words as you can. What mood does each sound create for your poem? Do you want your end words for each line to rhyme or not?

Set the timer for 7 minutes.

Start writing!

Don’t think about it too much; just do it.

*Kelly Bennett and I began this 7-Minute Poetry Challenge at least 650 days ago. We now take turns creating our own prompts to share with you. If you join us in the 7-Minute Poetry Challenge let us know by posting the title, a note, or if you want, the whole dang poem. Scroll down and click on the comments!

Poetry Challenge #17

Dream a Dream . . .

Dare to share one of your dreams in the form of a poem. It can be a personal dream, or a dream you have for a friend, humankind, the world, the universe, or beyond! As an homage to MLK, begin your poem with “I have a dream…”

Set the timer for 7 minutes.

Start writing!

Don’t think about it too much; just do it.

*Kelly Bennett and I began this 7-Minute Poetry Challenge at least 650 days ago. We now take turns creating our own prompts to share with you. If you join us in the 7-Minute Poetry Challenge let us know by posting the title, a note, or if you want, the whole dang poem. Scroll down and click on the comments!

Poetry Challenge #16

Brr!!! It’s a cold time of year! The sun sparkles off the ice-covered branches, the deck makes loud cracking noises, and I can breathe big clouds into the cold air. Write a poem about the cold. Begin with the line, “You know it’s cold when…” and think of all the things that make you know it’s cold. I hope you’re wrapped up in a blanket!!

Set the timer for 7 minutes.

Start writing!

Don’t think about it too much; just do it.

*Kelly Bennett and I began this 7-Minute Poetry Challenge at least 630 days ago. We now take turns creating our own prompts to share with you. If you join us in the 7-Minute Poetry Challenge be sure to let us know by posting the title, a note, or if you want, the whole dang poem, in the comments!

Poetry Challenge #15

This challenge is from Kelly’s blog. Be sure to check it out.

“Every time a bell rings, an angel gets its wings.” Does that line ring a bell? It’s little Zuzu enlightening her parents, George and Mary Bailey, in It’s a Wonderful Life (one of my favorite holiday pics). This time of year zillions of angels must get wings because Bells are Ringing! (another one of my favorites). In the spirit of the season, let’s get ringing!

Poetry Challenge #15
Ring My Bell!

Bells come in many shapes and sizes, with so many different uses, and sounds!
Begin by listing as many bells as come to mind. Here are a few to get you started: Sleigh bells, steeple bells, harness bells, doorbells, elf shoe bells, cow bells, Santa’s bells . . .
Next, list the different sounds those bells make. List real words and make up your own words by using letters to recreate sounds—after all this is your bell. Does it bong? Ring-a-ling? Clink?

Now, follow Zuzu’s lead and imagine what magical thing might happen each time your bell rings?

Write a poem about it. Be sure to include those sounds. Make your poem really ring!

Set the timer for 7 minutes.

Start writing!

Don’t think about it too much; just do it.

*Kelly Bennett and I began this 7-Minute Poetry Challenge at least 630 days ago. We now take turns creating our own prompts to share with you. If you join us in the 7-Minute Poetry Challenge be sure to let us know by posting the title, a note, or if you want, the whole dang poem, in the comments!

Poetry Challenge #14

Remember First!

Do you remember the first of something in your life? Maybe you remember the first time you rode a bike, the first time you visited someone by yourself, or the first time you went somewhere by yourself. Maybe you have early memories of reading or writing or hiking. Who did these things with you? Where were you? What did you like? What feelings do you remember?

Make a list of anything you remember about some first event. The more things you write down, the more you’ll remember. Add detail and play with the words and order to make the best poem you can. Try to repeat sounds for effect.

Set the timer for 7 minutes.

Start writing!

Don’t think about it too much; just do it.

*Kelly Bennett and I began this 7-Minute Poetry Challenge at least 630 days ago. We now take turns creating our own prompts to share with you. If you join us in the 7-Minute Poetry Challenge be sure to let us know by posting the title, a note, or if you want, the whole dang poem, in the comments!

Poetry Challenge #13

Smell That Smell . . .

Take a moment to recall a smell. Now write a poem describing it—without comparing it to another smell.

I agree, this challenge stinks…

Set the timer for 7 minutes.

Start writing!

Don’t think about it too much; just do it.

*Kelly Bennett and I began this 7-Minute Poetry Challenge at least 630 days ago. We now take turns creating our own prompts to share with you. If you join us in the 7-Minute Poetry Challenge be sure to let us know by posting the title, a note, or if you want, the whole dang poem, in the comments!

Poetry Challenge #12

I like…I love…

List five small things that make you really happy. It could be a thrush singing, hot fudge, a puppy, anything. Add specific details to each thing. Make yourself smile. Try to use alliteration (same beginning sounds). Rearrange them until they’re in the best order for your poem.

Set the timer for 7 minutes.

Start writing!

Don’t think about it too much; just do it.

*Kelly and I began this 7-Minute Poetry Challenge more than 610 days ago. We now take turns creating our own prompts to share with you. If you join us in the 7-Minute Poetry Challenge be sure to let us know by posting the title, a note, or if you want, the whole dang poem, in the comments!

Poetry Challenge #11

Thanksgiving has happened…Gobble Gobble! And this post is courtesy of Kelly’s blog. Click over for the original!

The way I learned it, this “Harvest Festival” has been celebrated in the U.S. since the Pilgrims survived that harsh winter of 1621 (with the help of friendly Wampanoag folk), and nationally on and off since 1789 when our 1st Pres, George requested a Congressional Proclamation. And, beginning in 1863 when our 16th Pres. Abe declared the last Thursday in November a national day of “Thanksgiving and Praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth in the Heavens”, every year thereafter.

Sometime along the line–you’ll have to do your own search to find out when exactly–the name was shortened and the date was changed to the 4th Thursday of November (Hence my earlier confusion.)

As the date became fixed, so have Thanksgiving Fixin’s, which now “traditionally” include pie, stuffing, potatoes, corn, cranberry, gravy, and TURKEY! According to the official White House History website, dear Ole’ Abe pardoned the first Thanksgiving Turkey in 1863. Ever since then presidents have been pardoning turkeys, thus leading to this week’s 7-Minute Poetry Challenge Prompt:

Poetry Challenge #11
Pardon Me, Pleeease!
Pretend you are the Turkey. . . or the pumpkin, apple pie, potatoes, cranberries and any other food served on Thanksgiving. Write a poem about why you deserve to not be part of this year’s feast. Begin with this first line: “Oh, please pardon me…” For extra credit make it rhyme.

For inspiration, read Kelly’s poem on her blog!

*Kelly and I began this 7-Minute Poetry Challenge more than 610 days ago. We now take turns creating our own prompts to share with you. If you join us in the 7-Minute Poetry Challenge be sure to let us know by posting the title, a note, or if you want, the whole dang poem, in the comments!